JOURNAL OF BIOSCIENCE AND BIOTECHNOLOGY DISCOVERY
Integrity Research Journals

ISSN: 2536-7064
Model: Open Access/Peer Reviewed
DOI: 10.31248/JBBD
Start Year: 2016
Email: jbbd@integrityresjournals.org


Integrated control of postharvest decay on sweet orange fruits by hot water and Sodium Carbonate (Na2CO3) applications

https://doi.org/10.31248/JBBD2016.006   |   Article Number: A0DC4A2C3   |   Vol.1 (1) - April 2016

Received Date: 05 February 2016   |   Accepted Date: 18 March 2016  |   Published Date: 30 April 2016

Authors:  Oladele O. O.* and Owolabi O. J.

Keywords: incidence, storage., decay, Citrus sinensis, treatment.

Integrated control of postharvest decay on sweet orange fruits by hot water and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) applications during subsequent storage at 28°C was investigated and the effect of such treatment on internal quality attributes of orange fruits determined. Mature sweet orange fruits without bruises were selected and washed in 2% sodium hypochlorite solution for 5 minutes before treatment. For ordinary sodium carbonate treatment (without hot water), selected fruits were separately immersed for 150 seconds in a water bath containing 2% (w/v) and 4% (w/v) sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) solutions. In another experiment, selected fruits were immersed for 150 seconds in a water bath containing hot water and sodium carbonate solution. Sodium carbonate concentrations at 2% (w/v) and 4% (w/v) in 45°C hot water temperature were tested. After treatment, the fruits were rinsed, allowed to air dry and then placed inside plastic buckets and stored at 25°C and 88% relative humidity and assessed weekly for mould infection. Result showed that fruits treated with 4% ordinary Na2CO3 concentration had no incidence of decay during the first week of storage. However, untreated fruits and fruits treated with ordinary 2% Na2CO3 concentration recorded 20.00% disease incidence in the first week of storage. The percentage decay of fruits later increased to 44.16±10.83 in all the fruits treated with 2% Na2Co3 concentration by week two and continued till third week when they were completely diseased, having 100% decay incidence. The causal organisms in the decaying fruits were Penicillium digitatum and Phytophthora palmivora. However, fruits treated with 2% Na2CO3 concentration in 45ºC hot water recorded 0% decay incidence throughout storage duration which lasted for 6 weeks and as such implied that all the treated fruits were diseased free.

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